Health & Fitness Calculators
Calories Burned Calculator

Calories Burned Calculator

Track your calorie burn with our free calorie calculator. Quickly estimate your calories burned based on activity and duration.

Result

377 calories

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Table of Contents

  1. Factors That Affect Your Calories Burned
  2. Body Mass, Activity Duration, and Intensity
  3. The Measurement of Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET)
  4. Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR)
  5. A Person's Age, Gender, and Muscle Mass
  6. Environmental Factors
  7. Current Fitness Levels
  8. Hormonal Status
  9. Pre-Existing Medical Conditions
  10. How the Daily Calorie Burn Calculator Works
  11. Estimating Daily Calories Burned is Important
    1. Improving Overall Health
    2. Setting Realistic Goals
    3. Tracking Progress
    4. Understanding the Impact of Different Activities
    5. Motivation

Calories Burned Calculator

Looking for an effective tool to track your fitness progress? Congratulations! You've found our calorie-burning calculator.

Whether it's walking, running, or cycling, this calorie calculator estimates your calories burned based on the type and duration of your activity. So, if you’re looking for a great way to track your fitness progress, keep reading to learn more!

Factors That Affect Your Calories Burned

Determining the amount of calories burned through physical activity involves considering various factors. In fact, our calorie burn calculator accounts for several key elements, from your body weight and duration of activity to the Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET). In this section, we'll take a closer look at each factor.

Body Mass, Activity Duration, and Intensity

An individual's body weight plays a crucial role in determining the number of calories burned, even at rest. A person with a higher proportion of muscle, fat, or height will burn more calories. This is also evident during physical activity, as the body expends more energy to sustain a larger person compared to a smaller one. Therefore, a person weighing 200 pounds will burn more calories by running 1 mile than someone who weighs 100 pounds, assuming all other conditions are equal.

Exercise duration also significantly impacts calorie burn. As the duration of exercise increases, so does the number of calories burned. However, the intensity of the exercise also plays a role. For example, a person who walks 1 mile in 1 hour will burn fewer calories than someone who walks 5 miles in the same amount of time at a higher intensity.

The Measurement of Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET)

The most accurate measure of intensity is through oxygen consumption during exercise. The intensity of exercise and oxygen consumption have a direct correlation. As exercise intensity increases, so do the levels of oxygen that are consumed.

Oxygen consumption during exercise, compared to consumption at rest, gives a clear representation of the metabolic requirements of a given exercise. Furthermore, unlike heart rate, oxygen consumption is closely related to body mass, allowing for a standard of oxygen consumption to be established for specific exercises based on body mass.

Oxygen consumption is measured in MET (metabolic equivalent of a task). The original definition of MET is based on oxygen utilization and body mass. It represents the ratio of the rate at which a person expends energy (relative to their body mass) while performing a given physical task compared to a reference. The reference is the energy expended by an average person while sitting quietly, roughly equivalent to 3.5 mL of oxygen per kilogram per minute.

Scientists found this value experimentally by measuring the MET of a healthy 40-year-old male who weighed 154 pounds. A MET value of 1 represents the energy expended by an average person at rest, a value of 2 requires twice as much energy as an average person expends at rest, a value of 8 requires eight times as much energy, and so on.

Exercises are commonly classified as light intensity, moderate intensity, or vigorous intensity exercises. Higher-intensity exercises have a higher MET. For example, walking slowly is a light-intensity exercise with a 2.0 MET, playing doubles in tennis is a moderate-intensity exercise with a 5.0 MET, and going at a rate of 100 jumps per minute while jumping rope is a vigorous-intensity exercise with an 11.0 MET.

Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR)

Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the amount of energy expended by the body at rest to maintain basic life-sustaining functions such as breathing and circulation. It is responsible for the majority of the calories a person burns in a day and is affected by factors such as muscle mass, age, height, and weight.

A person with a higher BMR burns more calories at rest than someone with a lower BMR. Therefore, if a person wants to increase the number of calories they burn, they can work on increasing their BMR through activities such as strength training and muscle building.

A Person's Age, Gender, and Muscle Mass

A person's age, gender, and muscle mass can all affect the number of calories burned during physical activity.

  • Age: As a person gets older, their body may not be as efficient in burning calories during exercise. This is partly due to the natural decline of muscle mass as we age.
  • Muscle mass: The more muscle a person has, the more calories they will burn during physical activity. This is because muscle tissue is more metabolically active than fat tissue, meaning it requires more energy to move. This is why strength training and muscle building can increase the number of calories burned.
  • Gender: Men tend to burn more calories than women during physical activity due to having a higher muscle mass and a higher percentage of lean muscle mass. Men also have a higher metabolism than women, which means they burn more calories at rest and during activity.

Environmental Factors

Environmental factors, such as temperature, altitude, and humidity, can also play a role in the number of calories burned during physical activity.

  • Temperature: When exercising in hot temperatures, the body has to work harder to cool itself, which can increase the number of calories burned. However, exercising in extremely hot or cold temperatures can also be dangerous and may make it difficult for a person to sustain the level of intensity they need to burn a significant amount of calories.
  • Altitude: As altitude increases, the concentration of oxygen in the air decreases, making it more difficult for the body to obtain the oxygen it needs during physical exertion. The body may have to increase its metabolic rate to facilitate oxygen delivery to the muscles and maintain energy production. This can result in a higher caloric expenditure compared to performing the same activity at sea level. However, the extent to which additional calories are burned varies widely among individuals and acclimatization to altitude can reduce this effect over time.
  • Humidity: High humidity can make it harder for the body to cool itself, which can increase the number of calories burned during physical activity. However, it can also make it difficult to breathe, which can reduce the intensity and duration of exercise, thus reducing the number of calories burned. Low humidity can make it easier for the body to cool itself, but it can also cause dehydration, which can be dangerous and can also make it difficult to maintain high-intensity exercise.

Current Fitness Levels

An individual's fitness level can have an impact on their exercise intensity and, therefore, the number of calories they burn. A person who is in better physical condition will burn fewer calories when performing the same exercise as someone who is less fit. This is due to the body of a person who is in better shape being more efficient and requiring less energy to perform the same activity.

Hormonal Status

Hormonal levels can also play a role in the number of calories burned during physical activity. Pregnancy, for example, causes a shift in a woman's hormonal levels and can affect the number of calories burned. Pregnant women often experience an increase in appetite, which can make it more difficult to maintain a calorie deficit, making it harder to burn calories.

Menopause is another hormonal change that can affect the number of calories burned. As women go through menopause, their estrogen levels decrease, which can cause a decline in muscle mass and an increase in body fat. This can lead to a reduction in the number of calories burned during physical activity.

Pre-Existing Medical Conditions

Certain medical conditions can also affect the number of calories burned during physical activity.

  • Thyroid disorders: The thyroid gland is responsible for regulating metabolism, so when it's not functioning properly, it can lead to a slower metabolism, which means fewer calories burned. People with hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid, may find it harder to lose weight and burn calories.
  • Diabetes: People with diabetes may have difficulty burning calories due to insulin resistance, which can make it harder for the body to use glucose for energy. This can cause a person to burn fewer calories during physical activity.
  • Cardiovascular Conditions: Some cardiovascular conditions can make it difficult for a person to sustain high-intensity exercise, which can reduce the number of calories burned.

How the Daily Calorie Burn Calculator Works

Our calculator uses the following formula to estimate calories burned:

Calories = (Time × MET × Body Weight) / 200

The principles behind using a calories burned calculator are based on the idea that physical activity requires energy and that energy is measured in calories. The more intense the activity and the longer it is performed, the more calories will be burned.

Calories burned calculators use data from scientific studies to determine the metabolic equivalent of a task (MET) for various activities. The MET is a ratio of the energy expended during an activity to the energy expended at rest. This value is then used in conjunction with the duration of the activity and the person's body weight to estimate the number of calories burned.

It's important to note that the estimate provided by the metabolic calculator is just an approximation, and individual results may vary. Factors such as a person's fitness level, hormonal levels, and medical conditions can affect the number of calories burned.

It's always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any exercise routine.

Estimating Daily Calories Burned is Important

There are many reasons a person should be concerned with estimating their daily calories burned. Here are some of the top reasons:

Improving Overall Health

Staying at a healthy weight is crucial for your overall health and well-being. By understanding the number of calories burned during the day, a person can make informed decisions about their diet and exercise routine that can help them maintain a healthy weight and improve their overall health.

The truth is that regular physical activity has been linked to a lower risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer. By understanding how many calories are burned during the day, a person can make sure that they are getting enough physical activity to maintain a healthy weight and improve their overall health.

Setting Realistic Goals

Knowing the number of calories burned during the day can help a person set realistic goals for weight loss or weight management. For example, if a person burns 2000 calories per day, they can set a goal to burn an additional 500 calories through exercise in order to create a calorie deficit.

Tracking Progress

Keeping track of the number of calories burned during the day can also help a person track their progress and make adjustments to their routine as needed.

Understanding the Impact of Different Activities

Knowing how many calories are burned during different activities can help a person choose activities that will help them reach their goals more efficiently.

Motivation

Seeing the number of calories burned during the day can be motivating and can help a person to stay committed to their weight loss or weight management goals.